The corruption of youth and beauty in sonnet 95 by william shakespeare

For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.

The corruption of youth and beauty in sonnet 95 by william shakespeare

Written by nickchristian86 The following essay is a first draft of my final project for my Writing about Literature class at Bridgewater State University.

I still have to go through and copy edit and do my MLA citations. But I wanted to get a draft up just to put it up here. What I would like to contend in this essay is that Shakespeare shows an often unrecognized growth within his Fair Youth sonnets that the majority of society does not acknowledge by lumping them into the same category.

Two of my favorite Shakespearian sonnets will be put on display in this analysis. The key thing to notice while comparing the two poems is how Shakespeare matures from one poem to another. Sonnet 18 is pop culture. Because this poem has been redone into so many mediums so many times, it is hard to believe that people have a view of the poem outside of what they saw in a movie or a television program.

How Sonnet 18 needs to be addressed, at least in terms of this essay, is through a lens of purely textual analysis. That, compared with a similar take on Sonnetwill allow us to see the type of personal growth Shakespeare makes throughout his sonnet writing.

The best way to tackle Sonnet 18 is by breaking up the Quatrains and the Couplet. The first thing to look at is the opening stanza: Thou art more lovely and more temperate: The first thing to note is line one. It is a prompt.

Shakespeare's Sonnets

Looking at the sonnets in a bigger picture it is comprised into two sentences. Is he acting in sincerity — trying to figure out the sheer definition of the subject before him?

Those questions are things hard to analyze without taking into some outside-of-the-text information and need more of a complete view of the poem to develop any context. But, as first lines go, it establishes quite the subject matter for the next 13 lines. The second line gives us a visualization of who Shakespeare is encapsulating, regardless of the actual identity of the person.

Definition - sonnet 95

It is fleeting — here today and gone tomorrow — and it is often associated with images of true beauty: So, if the subject is more lovely and more temperate, the subject must have the extended qualities of these days. Summer in a person would be a person full of flush life, eager to attack the fall of tomorrow but willing to bask in the sunshine of the day.

The last line of this section continues on that theme.

In terms of the structure of the poem, line four plays a bigger purpose in the poem. The colon indicates a list is coming. Really, the colon is the first signal that the poem mirrors a seasonal quality.

Our end goal, our desire for eternity in some sort of ethereal paradise can be reflected here or Shakespeare can be talking about the earthly passions between two people and how they can disrupt a life. The complexity of this conversation continues with the line being able to take on multiple meanings.

His gold complexion dimmed, in its deeper meaning, refers to possible a misreading of the eye of heaven which distorts the true view of some sort of heavenly father that the speaker believes in.

The other, more literal meaning attached to this line is often the account of the bad days of summer, which the next two lines get more in to explicating. Much like lines three and four, lines seven and eight mark a longer thought and the transition into a new theme or, structurally, quatrain.

Is Shakespeare trying to be comforting? To let the subject know there is immortality outside of the heavens? In line nine some of the earlier claims that have been made are reinforced. But there is also a contradiction present.

If we know every fair from fair sometime declines, as line seven asserts, why does Shakespeare, in line 10, make the proclamation that the subject will not lose the fair they own?

If Shakespeare has said to the subject that they cannot die but has also claimed that everyone dies, what are we, the reader or the listener, to make of this? That question is answered in line William Shakespeare ().

Truth and Decay in Shakespeare's Sonnets

“The dramatic works and poems of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of Steevens and Malone, with life, and historical, critical, and explanatory notices by A. Cunningham, a glossary and illustrations”, p SONNET 95 How sweet and lovely dost thou make the shame Which, like a canker in the fragrant rose, Doth spot the beauty of thy budding name!

O, in what sweets dost thou thy sins enclose! Shakespeare, William. Sonnets. Ed.

William Shakespeare – Sonnet 95 | Genius

Thomas Tyler. London: D. Nutt, About “Sonnet 95” The 95th sonnet in Shakespeare’s famous sequence is part of the ‘Young Man’ or ‘Fair Youth’ mini-sequence, a series of sonnets addressed to a young man, probably Shakespeare’s patron and lover, which takes up the large part of the sequence as a whole.

May 04,  · “The Corruption of the Fair Youth” A look at Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 and Written by nickchristian86 The following essay is a first draft of my final project for my Writing about Literature class at Bridgewater State University.

The corruption of youth and beauty in sonnet 95 by william shakespeare

Sonnet 95 is one of sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William initiativeblog.com's a member of the Fair Youth sequence, in which the poet expresses his love towards a young man..

Synopsis. The youth's dissolute behaviour is making corruption seem beautiful. Even descriptions of the youth's behaviour make it beautiful. Sonnet 95 is one of sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William initiativeblog.com is a member of the Fair Youth sequence, in which the poet expresses his love towards a young man..

Synopsis. The youth's dissolute behaviour is making corruption seem beautiful. Even descriptions of the youth's behaviour make it beautiful.

Sonnet How Sweet And Lovely Dost Thou Make The Shame Poem by William Shakespeare - Poem Hunter