Ethical perspective on social responsibility

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Ethical perspective on social responsibility

Corporate Social Responsibility Corporate social responsibility or CSR has been defined by Lord Holme and Richard Watts in the World Business Council for Sustainable Development 's publication "Making Good Business Sense" as "…the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as the local community and society at large.

Evidence suggests that CSR taken on voluntarily by companies will be much more effective than CSR mandated by governments. Every company has different CSR objectives though the main motive is the same. All companies have a two-point agenda—to improve qualitatively the management of people and processes and quantitatively the impact on society.

The second is as important as the first and stake holders of every company are increasingly taking an interest in "the outer circle"-the activities of the company and how these are impacting the environment and society.

While many corporations include social responsibility in their operations, it is still important for those procuring the goods and services to ensure the products are socially sustainable.

These resources help corporations and their consumers identify potential risks associated with a product's lifecycle and enable end users to confirm the corporation's practices adhere to social responsibility ideals.

Learning Objectives

Scientists and engineers[ edit ] One common view is that scientists and engineers are morally responsible for the negative consequences which result from the various applications of their knowledge and inventions.

Committees of scientists and engineers are often involved in the planning of governmental and corporate research programs, including those devoted to the development of military technologies and weaponry. It has been pointed out that the situation is, unfortunately, not that simple and scientists and engineers should not be blamed for all the evils created by new scientific knowledge and technological innovations.

Because of the intellectual and physical division of labor, the resulting fragmentation of knowledge, the high degree of specialization, and the complex and hierarchical decision-making process within corporations and government research laboratories, it is exceedingly difficult for individual scientists and engineers to control the applications of their innovations.

The scientists and engineers cannot predict how their newly generated knowledge and technological innovations may be abused or misused for destructive purposes in the near or distant future.

Education for Global Citizenship

While the excuse of ignorance is somewhat acceptable for those scientists involved in very basic and fundamental research where potential applications cannot be even envisioned, the excuse of ignorance is much weaker for scientists and engineers involved in applied scientific research and technological innovation since the work objectives are well known.

For example, most corporations conduct research on specific products or services that promise to yield the greatest possible profit for share-holders. Similarly, most of the research funded by governments is mission-oriented, such as protecting the environment, developing new drugs, or designing more lethal weapons.

In all cases where the application of scientific knowledge and technological innovation is well known a priori, it is impossible for a scientist or engineer to escape responsibility for research and technological innovation that is morally dubious.

Definition of Corporate Social Responsibility:

Furthermore, because taxpayers provide indirectly the funds for government-sponsored research, they and the politicians that represent them, i.Critics have argued that, from an ethical perspective, altruistic CSR is immoral since it represents a violation of shareholder rights if they are not given the opportunity to vote on the initiatives launched in the name of corporate social responsibility.

Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility – Is there a Dividing Line? In our paper we have explored the concepts of Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility with a perspective that meaningfully CSR should be seen in the context of an overall paradigm of Business Ethics.

Ethical perspective on social responsibility

CSR in the context of Business Ethics . Abstract. Companies have believed for years that their only responsibility was a financial one—maximizing value for shareholders.

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a new idea—where the corporate sector incorporates social and environmental concerns in its strategies and plays a more responsible role in the world. The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) field presents not only a landscape of theories but also a proliferation of approaches, which are controversial, complex and unclear.

This article tries to clarify the situation, “mapping the territory” by classifying the main CSR theories and related. Ethical Capitalism: Shibusawa Eiichi and Business Leadership in Global Perspective (Japan and Global Society) [Patrick Fridenson, Kikkawa Takeo] on initiativeblog.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Shibusawa Eiichi (–) was a Japanese banker and industrialist who spearheaded the modernization of Japanese industry and finance during the Meji Restoration. Key Themes 3 • A random search of articles and books on CSR.

We searched data-bases and library catalogs using keywords such as corporate social responsibility, corporate citizenship, corporate sustainability, ethical.

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